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Dominican Republic pledges to safeguard citizenship rights
Published on January 9, 2014 Email To Friend    Print Version

By Joe Colas

PORT AU PRINCE, Haiti (HCNN) -- During an historic and frank dialogue at the border town of Ouanaminthe, Dominican Republic authorities pledged to enact measures to safeguard the basic rights of Haitians and their descendants living in the country.

Both countries noted that dialogue around this divisive issue was conducted in a tone of mutual respect and that it was "frank, constructive and enlightening."

Recognizing the sovereign right of the Dominican Republic to enact migration policy, Haitian Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe requested guarantees that the government of that country will enact specific measures to safeguard the fundamental rights of people of Haitian descent who have been affected by the ruling of the Dominican Constitutional Tribunal.

gustavo_montalvo.jpg
Minister of the Presidency Gustavo Montalvo
Dominican authorities headed by Minister of the Presidency Gustavo Montalvo provided those guarantees and pledged that within the next few weeks they will put forward additional legislation to respond to all cases that have been left out of their existing plan to provide documents to Haitians who are illegally working in that country.

Lamothe considered this a major breakthrough noting, "This outcome is a direct result of our government's efforts to address the circumstances stemming from the Dominican ruling."

Since September the Haitian government has followed a combined bilateral and multilateral approach aimed at engaging the Dominican government into a constructive dialogue about these issues. Haiti directly engaged in conversations with the Dominican government sponsoring meetings between the private sectors of both countries to insure that important channels of communication remained open.

At the same time, Haiti engaged institutions like CARICOM, the European Union, the United Nations, and the government of Venezuela in the conversations with the Dominicans. This approach culminated at the special summit of PetroCaribe in early December 2013 where, under the auspices of President Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela, both countries agreed to meet in Ouanaminthe on January 7.

Haitian and Dominican authorities called their first meeting historic and promised to meet again often to address migration, trade, environmental and security issues. Important side agreements on each of these issues were also announced.

Revealing how deep the ties between both countries run, Lamothe welcomed Montalvo at a Dominican factory that employs 7,000 Haitian workers to discuss issues that have come between both countries in recent months.

The meeting was attended by observers from the European Union, the United Nations, CARICOM, and the government of Venezuela who throughout the session provided important commentary and advice. They also played an important mediating role that enabled the discussion to move forward on controversial issues. Additionally they pledged to closely follow the process from here on and committed their presence in each of the future meetings to be held in both countries.
 
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Comments:

Taino/Arawak from the Haitian side:

Additionally, as a person who prefers to identify themself as Kiskeyan rather than either of it's individual countries, I think Madino shows that he's not too competent at foreign relations and scope. He makes it easier to see atleast 1 specific characteristic of dominicans, as I know from personal experiences. But not all of them are that way, I'd say atleast half. Meanwhile, haitians continue to surge into D.R. illegally, on purpose, so extensively that it's become a problem for the country. And solving the problem, that's actually Haiti's but D.R. is involved in, doesn't benefit D.R. and Haiti will not and cannot solve it's own problems. That is the basis/formula for this conflict that's going on. There's maybe +200,000 illegals that Haiti won't account for...Not to forget that Haitians are not nice people. The longer I've known my Haitian side of the family, the longer I've wanted to not be around 'em. It's not a win-win situation. BUT, overall, my truth is, I've wondered if I'm the ony 1 who can see how similar Haitian and Dominican cultures are...Maybe it's just me

Pierre F. Lherisson:

The Haitian-Dominican meeting that was held on 07 January 2014 in the city of Ouanaminthe located in the Nord-Est Department of Haiti, will be known in history as a day of infamy for the Martelly-Lamothe Government.

This meeting must be equated as an act of high treason against the national interests of the Republic of Haiti and against the Dominican born of African ascendancy because the Dominican Court ruling TC/0168/13 issue which is the crux of the matter presumably was excluded from the agenda. Even if the TC/0168/13 agenda was surreptitiously discussed at the meeting, the fact that the Haitian press release was vague at best and used vice de form and technicality to label the Afro Dominicans as people of Haitian origins instead of Dominican of Haitian ascendancy which will facilitate their deportation to Haiti at an opportune time. It means that Haitian masses and the Dominicans of African ascendancy will continue to live in wretched conditions, oppression and humiliation under the capricious thumb of their historical mulatto bigots who are oppressing blacks on the occidental and oriental sides of the Haitian Island aka Kiskeya.

The legal action against Dominican Republic immigration bigotry, spearheading by CARICOM political Titans and Titanesses such as Prime Minister of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: Ralph Everard Gonsalves; Prime Minister of Jamaica: Portia Simpson Miller; Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago: Kamla Persad-Bissessar have given impetus and momentum against the Dominican Republic court ruling bigotry TC/0168/13.

The CARICOM intervention draw the world attention on Dominican Republic iniquitous tribal mentality practices which prompted other countries and international organizations to warn D.R to repel the TC/0168/13. Among them are: Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro Moros; OAS-Inter-American Commission on Human Rights-IACHT; U.S. State Department; U.N. High Commission on Human Rights. This in turn generated tremendous pressure on Dominican Republic by tarnishing its human rights practices which will entails some far reaching consequences on its diaspora and economy. Thus it was absurd for Haiti to accept a bilateral meeting with Dominican Republic that arrogantly said that its illegal law TC/0168/13 is not negotiable.

This bilateral meeting that occurred in Ouanaminthe was simply a gentlemen agreement between the Dominican mulattoes oligarchy and the Haitian mulattoes oligarchy that have interwoven economic interests they are sharing on the island of Haiti aka. Kiskeya.

The Martelly-Lamothe acted as a 9-1-1 Emergency Services to rescue Dominican Republic oligarchy from a diplomatic, political and public relations debacle and nightmare of the first magnitude from world opinion. By doing so, both are protecting their fortunes and privileges at the expense of the human rights of the masses.

Taino/Arawak from the Haitian side:

*sigh* Originally, my first message was 'I'm glad with this outcome. Things were headed downhill. Being that I'm related to both sides of the island, I was going through a mental obstacle course for the last 3, 4 days.'

I wrote more when I submitted this message the first time, but forgot it. The people behind this site still have kinks to work out.

Taino/Arawak from the Haitian side:

Medino is setting a bad standard/reputation for D.R. though. He's showing 1)he's not too competent at foreign relations and scope, 2) he's willing to openly discriminate against 1 people group in particular, & 3) setting a bad reputation for the country. A central american at my customer service job asked me about these ngoings 2 days ago, thinking I'm Dominican. Said he was informed about things from tv + he spoke to me only in spanish (in S. Florida). He didn't have positive regards for the situation.

Carson C. Cadogan:

Its about time.

Better late than never!


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